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Mathematics is filled with patterns. Patterns help a child predict an answer. Even young children can find simple, basic patters such as occur when counting by 5’s. These patterns entice all children as they find simplify the learning process. Children who enjoy order and symmetry are especially delighted.

Patterns will help a child learn their multiplication tables. If a child needs to learn their six times tables, learning to count by sixes first, helps them understand which numbers are in the answer.

Discourage your child from counting on their fingers. It can become a habit that will only slow them down as they progress to higher math. With certain math facts: adding, subtracting, basic multiplication and division, rote learning is needed.

Showing patterns is easiest with the 2’s:

  2       4     6     8    10
12     14   16   18    20
22     24   26   28    30

With the threes, the 1, 3, 5 columns in bold represent counting by threes and the columns next to them show what the answer is when you add the digits together. (If you draw this out on paper for your child, use a different color, such as red, to represent the answers).  All of column one adds up to 3, column three adds to 6, and column five adds to 9. This works perpetually—I mentally went only as far as 198= 18=9. If the first adding of digits results in a two digit number, add them again, though a secondary pattern does emerge with the first answer.

 3       3      6      6      9      9
12      3    15      6     18     9
21      3    24      6     27     9
30      3    33      6     36     9

Fours have a different pattern. You’ll have to start adding twice with the number 28, but a pattern is there even if you don’t.

  4                4             8                8
12                3            16               7
20                2            24               6
28        (10) 1             32              5
36                9            40              4
44                8            48       (12) 3
52                7            56       (11) 2

Sixes are like threes.

  6      12      18
24      30      36
42      48      54
60      66      72

When you get to the sevens, challenge your child to find the pattern. Notice that the pattern is horizontal rather than vertical. The top row descends by odd numbers, the second by even numbers and so on.

  7        7       14        5       21           3         28        (10)   1
35        8       42        6       49           4         56        (11)   2
63        9       70        7       77    (14) 5        84        (12)   3

Eights have two patterns. The horizontal answers, as shown in the sevens, descend, but also when you look at just the seven multiples vertically, the digits in the ones place are the same.

   8          8        16        7        24        6          32        5        40        4
48    (12) 3       56    (11) 2     64     (10) 1     72        9        80        8
88    (16) 7       96    (15) 6

As a child, the only pattern I knew was with the nines time tables. I loved my nines. I found that the answer always added up to nine. But the additional trick to get the right answer was to subtract 1. So that if I multiplied 9 x 3, I would think, 3-1=2. I knew the answer began with a 2. 2+7=9. 9×3=27. After a child understand this, it becomes automatic.

x1       x2       x3       x4       x5       x6      x7       x8       x9       x10
  9       18       27      36      45       54      63       72       81        90

For fun, write the nines facts, stopping at 45, and wrapping the remaining numbers in the sequence around below.

  9       18      27      36      45  ↓
90       81      72      63      54 ←

There are more patterns in mathematics than I know. This link leads to some very interesting ones. The pattern near the bottom where they assign numbers to letters, is not totally accurate because the author leaps from the sums of a basic addition to percentages, and I prefer to keep mathematics logical, but it’s still fun.

This last year I became introduced to fractals. Through fractals, scientists are now discovering the patterns and equations of nature. I was taught that Mathematics is the language by which God created the Universe. I am not a mathematician. I’ve not taught math beyond algebra. But the more I have learned, the more astounding it becomes. Help your child find the wonder of this language.

This video “Hunting the Hidden Dimention” is about an hour–but amazing! Watch it with your family. Click the play button and gather around.

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